Sun. Feb 5th, 2023

grip for slider

When it comes to throwing a slider, it is essential to have a good grip. If you do not have a solid grip, your pitch will be weakened and you will be more likely to miss the baseball or throw the ball into the outfield. This is because you will be unable to control the speed of your pitch. You will also be more likely to miss the home plate and make a costly error.

We're an affiliate

We hope you love the products we recommend! Just so you know, we may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page. Thank you if you use our links, we really appreciate it!

Arm speed should remain the same as fastball arm speed

The slider is a trickier pitch to throw well than its fastball cousin. It is typically held off center and can be difficult to hit, despite the pitch’s superior motion.

Fortunately, there is a proper technique to employ. A good rule of thumb is to make the motion of the slider the same as a fastball. This helps reduce arm drag and a shortened reaction time.

In addition to the arm motion, there are some things you can do to make the slider a success. First and foremost, use a firm grip on the ball. You want to avoid wrist twisting or bending, which will limit the velocity of your slider. Also, shorten your hand out of the hip to reduce the force your elbow puts on the ball.

Another trick is to pull the glove in to your chest, which sends your body weight away from the plate. While this may seem counterproductive, it actually allows your arm to travel farther and create more spin on the ball.

Movement profiles of sliders

When throwing sliders, players should understand the type of movement they have. It’s a key element to developing the pitch. The better you understand the pitch’s moves, the more momentum you’ll have when you’re preparing to throw it.

When you think of sliders, you may consider them to be a middle point between fastballs and curveballs. These pitches are thrown at approximately 6-10 mph faster than a fastball, and they are able to generate backspin, a horizontal component, and strong lateral movement. This combination allows the pitcher to make hitters cover the entire width of the plate.

With the addition of pitch design technology, like Rapsodo and Edgertronic, a pitcher can tweak the shape of the pitch. By tinkering with seam orientation and grip, sliders can be shaped to maximize their effectiveness.

The most effective sliders are those that get whiffs and have high run values. For instance, Garrett Cleavinger’s slider showed an increase in effectiveness during the 2021 season. Another pitcher to notice an improvement was Corey Kluber.



Practice throwing sliders while playing catch

A slider is a cross between a fastball and a curveball. It is easier to throw and harder to catch than a curveball.

A slider is thrown at a lower velocity than a fastball. This means it will require more accuracy. When thrown correctly, a slider is a debilitating pitch. The best way to improve your slider is to practice throwing it. Having a coach to help you is also beneficial.

The speed change should be around eight to ten percent slower than a fastball. But, this isn’t as important as the feel of the pitch. As long as your arm moves well, you should be good to go.

To make the slider work, you need to grip the ball the right way. For starters, it’s better to grip the ball with two fingers. Your index finger should be placed next to your middle finger. This allows you to get a little more spin on the ball.

SL 2 grip

If you’re looking for a grip that gives you a solid wrist snap on your slider release, the SL 2 grip is one you might consider. The SL 2 grip is similar to the four-seam fastball grip, but the fingers are placed slightly off-center, between the seams. This allows the fingers to impart spin at the release. You may also notice a small horizontal break towards the glove side.

Unlike the SL 2 grip, the SL 3 grip has the fingers located farther up the seam, directly on the ball. This creates a more negative vertical break. Another difference between the two grips is the position of the thumb. It is positioned on the inside of the ball, and is slightly off the side of the index finger. However, there is nothing to stop you from moving it to the thumb side of the index finger if you want to be more comfortable.